Effects of microcomputer assisted instruction and classwide peer tutoring on computational skill achievement of third grade students

Author:
Gmitter, James Walter, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia
Advisors:
Esposito, James, Cu-Leadshp Fndns & Pol Studies, University of Virginia
Burbach, Harold, Cu-Leadshp Fndns & Pol Studies, University of Virginia
Callahan, Carolyn, Cu-Curr Instr & Sp Ed, University of Virginia
Clark, David L., University of Virginia
MacDougall, Mary A., Curry School of Education, University of Virginia
Abstract:

The central purpose of this study was to compare the computational skill achievement of third grade students receiving microcomputer assisted instruction (MAI) or class-wide peer tutoring (CPT) drill and practice to third grade students receiving only traditional instruction. The MAI and CPT drill and practice strategies were used as an integral part of the traditional mathematics instructional program. A second purpose was to determine the relationship between attainment of computational skills and the amount of time allocated for the treatment.

The subjects were one hundred sixty-two students from seven intact third grade classrooms. Six classes served as the treatment groups and one class served as the non-treatment, comparison group. The treatment groups received MAI or CPT drill and practice on the basic math facts for ten, twenty, or thirty minutes daily as part of the traditional mathematics program.

A quasi-experimental pretest/posttest design was selected. Quantitative and qualitative data collection and analyses were combined in this study. Qualitative methods were used for description, support, and elaboration of the data established through quantitative methods.

Computational skill achievement was measured by the Stanford Achievement Test – Mathematics and a microcomputer-generated Math Facts Test. Classroom observations and teacher interviews were used to collect qualitative data related to this study.

Filtered through the limitations of the study the finding suggest the following quantitative and qualitative conclusions: (1) MAI may be more effective than CPT. ( 2) CPT may be more effective than only traditional instruction. (3) Students receiving MAI may learn the computational skills more quickly than the students receiving CPT. (4) Twenty minutes of MAI may be the most effective. (5) Computational skill achievement as it relates to SES, achievement levels, and treatment may not be significantly different across all groups. (6) Teachers perceived that MAI and CPT were effective instructional strategies across all SES and computational skill achievement level groups. (7) students perceived that the treatments were effective and the students liked the strategies. (8) Students receiving MAI maintained greater enthusiasm than the students receiving CPT.

Note: Abstract extracted from PDF file via OCR.

Degree:
EDD (Doctor of Education)
Keywords:
Computer-assisted instruction, Mathematics, Study and teaching, Peer teaching, Third grade (Education)
Language:
English
Rights:
All rights reserved (no additional license for public reuse)
Issued Date:
1989